Skip to main content

About your Search

20131101
20131130
STATION
CSPAN2 118
LANGUAGE
English 118
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 118 (some duplicates have been removed)
responsibility of health insurance. let's move forward as the state of massachusetts, as the presiding officer has already done, some 98%, i understand, have health insurance protection in the commonwealth of massachusetts thanks to the leadership of governor mitt romney and the cooperation of both political parties. massachusetts has shown us the way. let's follow that now. let's not turn our back on it. and the last point i'll make on this issue is i keep hearing from the republican side they have a better idea. what is it? i'd like to see the proposal from the republican side that they would put up against the affordable care act. you'll never see it because they basically believe let the market work its will. the market working its will has resulted in 40 million to 50 million uninsured americans. the number is growing, and it shouldn't. it won't under the affordable care act. now, mr. president, i'd like to address the business pending before the united states senate, the employment nondiscrimination act, and ask consent that it be shown in a separate part of the record from my earlier st
of the open enrollment period 106,000 or 1.4% of consumers are going to sign up. if you look at massachusetts, during its first month -- and, mr. president, i'm sure you're aware of this, being in new jersey, close to massachusetts, only 0.3%, or 123 people signed up for coverage out of the 36er,000 who ultimately signed up in the first year. so let's be clear. we all wanted to see bigger numbers, but the affordable care act numbers are four times better than what massachusetts did in its first month. if you talk to the people of massachusetts, they love their health care plan. and our plan is based on their plan. by the way, a republican plan. hundreds of thousands have started the enrollment proficiency and i'll onprocess,. i'm going to go shopping and buy my plafnlt but i'm taking my time because i have some time -- until december. i am going to discuss it with my husband. we're going to decide what's best for us. i'm going to sign up. you know, i think it was the secretary sebelius who said, this isn't like buying a toaster. this is a commitment for a year, and you've got to take your tim
at massachusetts during its first month, mr. president, i am sure you are aware of this being in new jersey, close to massachusetts, only 123 people signed up for coverage. of the 36,002 ultimately signed up in the first year. so let's be clear. we all want, bigger numbers. the affordable care act numbers are four times better than what massachusetts to it in its first month. if you talk to the people of massachusetts, another health care plan. our plan is based upon their plan. by the way, a republican plan. hundreds of thousands started the enrollment process, and i am one of them. i created an account and with a shopping and by my plan. but i am taking my time because i have some time. i will discuss it, decide what is best and sign up i think it was the secretary sibelius' who said this is not like buying a toaster. this is a commitment for a year. you have to take your time. don't come here and tear down the affordable care act without having to put anything in its place in focus on one problem that the president said he is going to fix and we're going to fix. things are going to pick up. i w
officers. and almost immediately the governor of massachusetts began recruiting free blacks. fly were distributed near and far from massachusetts to connecticut and pennsylvania, ohio, other northern states and even to canada. working to fill a first of 1,000 recruiters included prominent black frederick douglass and william henry johnson. the 45th massachusetts volunteer was the first northern black to be organized and among the recruit were two of frederick douglass' sons. the white officers were hand picked by the governor himself. subsequently, 23-year-old robert shaw became the chosen officer to lead the regular men had such great importance first because unlike the other black regularmen already organized in the south, it was composed of free black men. would rest on the conduct of the 45th massachusetts battle when the nay sayers were insisting blacks would not, could not fight. having no clue about the fire in their soul ready to ignite. frederick douglass. the 54th massachusetts four performed valiantly. they. they were honor recipient served. it was sergeant william consider
. it's got to be better. and it will be. take a look at that experience in massachusetts. the senator from california talked about that earlier. during the first month of enrollment in massachusetts, 123 people signed up. in the first 30 days. by the end of the year, though, 36,000 had signed up. the number of uninsured young people went from 25% to 10% within three years. massachusetts today, because of the leadership of governor mitt romney and the cooperation of the democratic legislature in that state, has nearly universal health insurance coverage. however the roll-out wasn't without some problems, just as ours s. thours is. the current governor said there were a series of web site problems. he also said the web site was a work in progress for the first few years. there were outages during peak times and problems searching for providers. i recently met with a doctor from boston. he's one of the best. he said, people in massachusetts can't remember what it was like before. they can't remember what it was like before people had health insurance. this doctor is an oncologist. he dea
is now back on the job serving and protecting the people of springfield, massachusetts. i'm also pleased to say nevada law also includes robust protections against this type of discrimination. officer carney testified before the house of representatives in 2007 and shared his story. mr. president, this is what he said: "i'm god cop. i've lost two and a half years of employment, fighting to get that job back because i'm gay. i never would have been able to do that had i not lived in massachusetts or in one of the handful of other states that protect employees from discrimination. sadly you mr. president, not everyone is able to fight back like officer carney. in 33 states, lesbian, gay yo cn be fired or harassed just for being who they are. sam hall was terrorized by his coworkers for seven years because he was gay. mr. hall just wanted to make a living. but supervisors told him he would have to endure the persecution if he wanted to keep his job. west virginia is one of 33 states with no protections against this type of discrimination. that's why, mr. president, i so admire joe manchin f
that because we know the product is good. senator boxer talked about the massachusetts experience in which during the first month of their enrollment for the massachusetts exchange, only .3 #% of the total signed up during that month. why? because people take time. this is not animal easy decision to sign up for health care. in connecticut where we have an exchang that's up and running, a wbsz thabs working, the first month, know our number? it was not.# # #%, but enrolled 10% of the expected total in the first 30 days, and here's what people say about their experience with connecticut's exchange. one said, this is a great resource for cops residents to apply for health coverage, thanks to the health care law. another said, i chose access health because i've been denied in the past by other carriers. before this law changed. another said, thank you so much for this health care law. i have not been insured in a decade. i am so, so, so thankful. another said, thank you for this program. i lost my job a year ago and couldn't find anything that i could afford in health coverage before this law
. there was 1955 speech at the assumption college in my hometown of massachusetts, where he said about the cold war that i believe religion itself is at the root of the struggle and not in terms of the physical organizations or christianity versus those of atheism, but in terms of good versus evil and right versus wrong. and in his remarks during the campaign at the tabernacle in salt lake city, where he said the enemy is a communist system itself, insatiable and unceasing in its drive for world domination, it is also a struggle for supremacy between conflicting nato ologies, freedom under god versus godless turning. in kennedy's famous lines in the inaugural address, the same revolutionary beliefs for which we are still at issue around the globe. coming not from the generosity of the state, but from the hand of god. we shall pay any price and bear any burden and meet any hardship and support any friends and oppose any foe to assure the survival and success of liberty. and ask not what your country can do for you, but ask what you can do for your country. and in december 1962 he said it are two cho
-- resident of massachusetts general. then as a speechwriter for vice president mondale for their presidential campaign then when he came to the new republic in 1981. that was the golden age. and what was interesting is of group of people with a group of ideas that frequently fought over them but at any rate charles won the national award at coveted prize then when it to go to "the washington post" and since it has continued to write for the "washington post" as it is an inspiring columnist you write one column per week it you cannot do more than that but it called the most powerful force kahane of american kazoo for to miss them. calling him the most important conservative columnist. you can hear him tonight to hear questions from the floor so save up your questions you are in for a real treat. mr. krauthammer. [applause] >> 84 being here mr. president and mrs. bush. there are nice introductions and there are kind introductions that lists your achievements transcribe and notarize to end said your mother a copy. to state -- despite your pitch reduction you included things that i now have to ex
enrollment period. and just in terms of the massachusetts experience, young adults have waited somewhat longer but the uninsured rates among young adults is 21% in the year prior to the passage of the law in massachusetts. that rate dropped to 8% in the after. i think it does, the experience, the survey research that we've done, the experience in massachusetts does suggest young adults will come into the market places, the numbers will help do what we're hoping they would do not only helping them but also stabilizing the market. spent so, we used all sorts of information sources to, on a weekly basis, hit the restart button. i had a meeting with my senior folks every week, looking back at what we know about enrollment, what we know about folks who were on the ground. so if we know that holding an event in the evening results in five people showing up versus launch, you get 50 people to show up, that's where our resources go. so we look at everything that's happened to not only the data we're seeing but also what we're hearing from our sisters. orienteering from brokers in community grou
different ways from different parts of the british isles so you had puritan massachusetts, anglican virginia, maryland founded by catholic family, quaker pennsylvania, dutch reform new york. the framers of the constitution understood this when they decreed there would be no religious test for federal office and the authors of the bill of rights understood when they said congress shall make no law regarding an establishment of religion which meant there would be no national religion but it also meant among other things that states could maintain their established churches, the commonwealth of massachusetts maintained an established church until 1843. americans have learned from early times not only to polk but even prosper as a nation with cultural diversity but that diversity has also led to severe strains and in one case to a seemingly irrepressible conflict. the first was the mass movement of the scotch irish from northern ireland and lowland scotland in a dozen years before the american revolution. they started coming over in some numbers in 1713 but there was a real rush, a real surge af
will support that. but i think we always assumed that, based on massachusetts' experience, the initial sign up will be very slow. and in fact, no payments have to be made until december 15 for coverage on january 1. so, while we don't like the problems we had in october and fixing it in november, we do not think it will impact the timeline because we have a six- month enrollment, so we still have four months left and individuals can apply up until march. >> thank you. thank you, mr. chairman. >> now to senator robert. -- senator roberts. senator robert? >> thank you, mr. chairman. 'm going to focus, if i can, on the concerns raised by senator isakson, alexander, and the chairman, on security and privacy. we have a law, the federal information security management .ct, his mother --fisma everything has to have an acronym. it requires each agency to a point a chief security officer to ensure americans private financial and identifying information is protected. and that is a big issue. secretary civilians revealed last week exchanges operating on temporary authority to operate. there is a 2012 12
speakers, and senators -- the gentlelady from massachusetts and washington state. i ask unanimous consent morning business be extended for these two for approximately ten minutes. the presiding officer: is there objection? seeing no objection, the request is granted. ms. mikulski: i now yield to the gentlelady from washington state and then massachusetts. the presiding officer: the gentlelady from washington. mrs. murray: first i want to thank the senator from maryland and the senator from maine for helping to bring so many of us to the floor today to talk about an issue that really cuts across bipartisan -- cuts across partisan lines and has plagued our nation's military and has gone unaddressed for far too long. military sexual assault is an epidemic, and it is right -- it has rightly been identified as such by the pentagon. it is absolutely unconscionable that a fellow service member, the person you rely on to have your back and to be there for you would commit such a terrible crime. it is simply appalling that they could commit such a personal violation of their brother or sister in u
and as a psychiatrist practiced three years with the chief residents -- resident of massachusetts general. then as a speechwriter for vice president mondale for their presidential campaign then when he came to the new republic in 1981. that was the golden age. and what was interesting is of group of people with a group of ideas that frequently fought over them but at any rate charles won the national award at coveted prize then when it to go to "the washington post" and since it has continued to write for the "washington post" as it is an inspiring columnist you write one column per week it you cannot do more than that but it called the most powerful force kahane of american kazoo for to miss them. calling him the most important conservative columnist. you can hear him tonight to hear questions from the floor so save up your questions you are in for a real treat. mr. krauthammer. [applause] >> 84 being here mr. president and mrs. bush. there are nice introductions and there are kind introductions that lists your achievements transcribe and notarize to end said your mother a copy. to state
of massachusetts who knew the whitey bulger case also contacted them, as did angelo, this forensic investigative who got a lot of the files and the confluence of the three of us, then reading my book, resulted in delphi keo on the 30th of march, 2006, came up from sarasota, florida, were hit retired with full pension and was indicted on four counts of murder. on the right, that's a picture of him the night before surrendering. allowed him to surrender but the next day after he was a million dollars bail was set for him, okay? 50 agents support them, showed up in lieu suits, white shirts, either red eyes are blue ties and they surrounded him as he walked out down the supreme court and there was a scene unlike you've ever seen. they were like pushing people away. they look like soccer hooligans. they were banging guys out of the way, straight army cuts protecting them while reporters were trying to protecting the they called it body checking the senator grassley from iowa mentioned this at a senate hearing whether fbi agent should be so quick to protect somebody who's presumed innocent of course,
in line two. no public school in 18th century boston admitted girls. beginning in 1701, massachusetts required for a messiah to teach boys to read and to write and girls to read. girls were not commonly taught to write in 18th century. they were taught inside to stitch. three in five women could not even find their names. many think about going to sign your name is not indication of literacy. it's a mechanical act. most of those who could sign their names could not actually write. the boston newspaper printed a dialogue between a tradesmen and his wife about the education of their daughter that gives you a glimpse of the 18th century ideas about women. the mother wishes to send her daughter to school. letter first fail to reach out during the bible that she may have mispronounced god people for constantinople. maker expert in radiator. the cosmic keeper and teacher was useful to boil and mixed the pudding, tonight, spin, so, to earn and to spend. i'll have her bread to book early, cookery. this is jane franklin's education. needle and thread. she cut her way to the candles, the worker
in stockbridge massachusetts is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you for that fabulously gracious introduction and i'm glad. i can't believe that the archive has been digitized now that i'm done. i wore gloves fy read through the papers but it's hard to turn pages. i'm glad to know that other people can now do it in ten minutes. i came to this book from the historical background and i studied history at cornell and attended college in the 70's at a time when abstract expressionism was seen as the high point as the great savior because it was said he shifted that capital. they have a mystical flying through the sky shifting the capitol. and the studied rockwell and i didn't really think about rockwell until other people started thinking about him first such as robert rosenblum who organized the show at the guggenheim museum in 2001. and i was immediately taken by the work. partly because i had been tired of spending my intellectual life at greenwich village in the 50's. i felt like i can't think again about that. his word struck me as really interesting. so i sort of took it started when i did
of this irresponsibility and the negligence of this company in massachusetts. a lawsuit was filed recently in nevada. two young boys were allegedly impacted significantly as a result of this medication that was really bad medication. unless the entire united states senate bends to that one senator's wish -- the one that voted "no" -- he will force this body to jump through hoops and work through the next several days wasting time to finish this crucial drug safety bill. but we're going to finish the bill. we're going to finish that bill. it's important for our country, and i can't let one senator dictate what goes on here in the senate. mr. president, following leader remarks, the senate will be in a period of morning business for two hours. republicans will control the first half, and the majority will control the final half. following that morning business, we will vote on the adoption of the motion to proceed to h.r. 3204, the pharmaceutical drug compounding bill. this is expected to -- i hope that in fact is the case. if thats case that is the case,e will said to what will happen subsequent to thasm
that the senator from the commonwealth of massachusetts is on the floor. i would inquire through the chair how long she is seeking to speak. we are about to proceed to the consideration of the amendment that has been filed by senator portman and cosponsored by senator ayotte, senator heller and senator mccain. and this is a rather complicated parliamentary situation. and then there's going to be a debate. if the senator from massachusetts is going to speak very briefly, i would withhold. if she's going to speak at length, then since we have members on their way, i would proceed. if we could inquire through the chair. mrs. warren: i would tell the senior senator from maine, my plan had been to speak for less than 10 minutes, but if that's not -- if that doesn't work, i certainly will yield to the senator from maine and do what she requests -- or whatever she needs here. ms. collins: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from maine. ms. collins: i would ask unanimous consent that the senator from massachusetts be permitted to speak for no longer than 10 minutes, and if it were a little
about the open moment period look at massachusetts and mr. president, i am sure you are aware of this being in new jersey coast of massachusetts only 0.2% sign up for coverage and out of the 36,000 who ultimately signed up in the first year. so let's be clear that we wanted to see bigger numbers of informal care act is four times better than what massachusetts did in its first month if you talk to people in massachusetts, they love the her health care plan and this is place content based on a republican plant. and i'm going to go shopping and buy a new plan. i'm taking my time because i have time and want to discuss it with my husband. i'm going to sign up and i think it was the secretary that said that is not like buying a toaster. and you have to take your time. and so don't do that without having to put anything in place and focus on the problem that the president said he needs to fix. i want to play the great news about california. just in the first few weeks, enrollment has doubled. and our story is a really g
massachusetts. ms. warren: i ask that the quorum call be lifted. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. warren: and i ask for permission to speak as if in morning business. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. warren: thank you. madam president, it hasn't been even a month since the end of the government shutdown and they are already back trying to paralyze the government again. yesterday the kwepbz -- republicans blocked a up-or-down vote on the nomination of nina pilllard. this filibuster comes one week after the republicans filibustered the nomination of patricia millett to the d.c. circuit and less than a year after republicans filibustered caitlin halligan who eventually gave up and withdrew her nomination. republicans now hold the dubious distinction of having filibustered all three women that president obama nominated to the d.c. circuit. now, collectively these women have diverse experiences in private practice, in government and in public interest law. between them, they have argued an amazing 45 cases before the supreme court and have participated in many more. all t
of cultural and ethnic equality broad different parts of the british isles. so you have spirited massachusetts coming anglican and virginia virginia, maryland founded by a catholic family in quaker pa., a dutch reformed york. the framers of the constitution understood this when they decreed no test for federal office and the bill of rights understood when they said congress shall make no law to establish a religion that meant no national religion but it also meant thate states could maintain their established church as the commonwealth of massachusetts and as it remained until 18303. americans have learned toe not only toa cope but prosperulu as a nation of cultural diversity but that has led to severe strains ended one case the irrepressible conflict. the first is the mass movement of lee scott irish before the american revolution they started to come over and some members in 1730 but there is a real surge after the seven years' war from the war of 1763 like earlier colonial settlers they did not come because of a mixture of religious or political reasons and so were coercion like white inden
democratic liberal from massachusetts everybody made fun of how fat he was. he had to get up every morning and go to work. i always said that was his latest courage, just going to work against reagan. tip would say he was the greatest speaker ever. it's in the book and he said better than candy, better than roosevelt. tip would do things -- relationship between the two sides was a different unimagined today. the speaker became friends with michael deaver. oliver north we all got along with. charles wick. we all knew him. there were like nice little courtesies passed back and forth is totally different than i think today. there was a guy who is dying on a hunger strike and mike deaver, i got them on the phone with the speaker and i said this guy just doesn't want -- a nuclear attack sobering called the body of christ, corpus christi. can we do something about that? mike was drinking at the time and he said it seems like a stupid reason to kill yourself. that was his attitude in those days, but on monday he went around cap weinberger in which a president reagan and they call the city of corp
of it with your day. but i also bring greetings from massachusetts robbery which is about 5 miles north of boston. as it turns out, the population is about 55,000. when i was writing this book i least kayten by ten office space from a local architect who was a one-term rotary president. he tell them before i came well as coming to speak to one of the oldest and suddenly friendliest in wichita, may be bigger committees is keeping short. these people are on their lunch break. but i did hear an awful lot and have led to your you guys tennant the way some of those gusty. but he did not know how to keep it short. i think some of you in toward that as well. he was a faithful person for more than 50 years to when this was as club. he joined rotary in 1950, and you can usually find in here without the element is. he was out of town he often made it a point to visit with other river clubs like we had today. and around different cities in the united states. he really loved rotary, and it came clear thrall of the speeches that he had. two books and speeches that i went through. he gave an awful lot. and in
to be. i'm happy to share some of it with you today. from massachusetts rotary. it's about 5 miles north. as it turned out, the population is about 55,000. when i was writing this book i subleased a ten by ten office space from a local architect who was in fact a one-term rotary president and now signing up for a second term. he told me before i came in and told them i was coming to speak to one of the most prestigious and oldest and certainly friendliest rotary's in wichita, may be bigger he said, keep it short. these people around the lunch break. [laughter] but i did hear an awful lot. i'm glad to hear you guys don't sign each other. sure did not know how to keep the short. i think some of you in toward that. he was a faithful rotarian for more than 50 years. this was his club. he joined in 1950, and you can usually find in here without fail on monday. if he was out of town they often made it a point to visit with the rotary clubs like we have today. different cities in the united states. they claim -- it became clear. i have two books of features. he gave an awful lot of speeches her
small business, another small business wants a $20 co-pay. so we know that from the massachusetts connector experience in small group market and we know that based on the commercial side of the market. and i have a private board that made many of these decisions with a lot of input from policy stakeholder workgroups. so we decided early on that we wanted, that we didn't want to limit products. we wanted carriers to be as innovative as they wanted to be. the one early decision that we made, which was unanimously recommended by all stakeholders including consumer groups, providers and carriers was that we would not allow benefits substitutions to the central health benefits package. and so that products could have additional benefits like acupuncture as an example, if not one of the core benefits. so the variation in product is really additional benefits on top of the essential health benefits benchmarked and the variation in your out of pocket liability. so the co-pay, coinsurance, et cetera. >> thank you. spent thank you. i also work in coalition with many asian-american organizat
in massachusetts where whittier was from. i had whittier rammed down my throat and didn't like him much. when the library of america called me to do the book on whittier, i thought, all right. i reread him and he was marvelous. i was too young for him. besides being a good poet. he was a wonderful man in many ways and was a long time abolitionist. he was more than antislavery. he wanted slavery enended. he didn't the president in a gradual way. i was interested in literary figures whom we know as literary fill your and their history. >> we come to history from a similar literary place. my graduate degree is in american literature, and i live on man tuck et largely because i like mobby dick. [laughter] and he does. >> i wrote a little book about that. and -- >> i'm a fan. and -- like wise. continuing and i was actually named for nathaniel haw thorn. wasn't it said that his biography of franklin piers was the greatest work of fiction he had ever written. >> yeah, it was said that. and he dedicated. when he dedicated a book to franklin piers. raffle -- ralph waldo emmerson took it out. he wrote
economic growth. the state of massachusetts has generally been very well on this and basically massachusetts has imported high skilled, high education people. it's exported metal skill that is a relatively small state. you have got, what, six-point something million people in a little less than arizona. california has 38 million in texas has 25 million. so massachusetts is almost like a single nice metro area that's worked out pretty well. but you still have pretty high levels of any quality as well. so, you know, call on the people that say they want more inequality -- more income equality how come the places that you run have the highest income inequality. and they think the answer is you tax the middle income people out, you have high housing costs by environmental regulations and other things like california, for example but also, metro new york. no population increase in the last 40 years. it's the same. immigrants in and americans out. that's been the pattern. if you want to raise a family and you are not high income, phd educated, you have a decent job, what does the hou
, i'm from massachusetts and i grew up in massachusetts we're drenched or hunched over with history, at least by american standards but then when i moved to austin itself and on history and jeff, what was your response to that coming from houston's? >> you came from -- from houston, yeah, in houston it seemed to me growing up there really wasn't any history there. houston always seemed to me to be a city about making money. if there's a historic site, somebody thinks they can make money on, they will tear it down. [laughter] whereas if they got a little bit different here in austin and things do change, but there's just a very rich history here. i'm amazed and going around in telling the stories how little of it to details of it and the importance of it on our life now that people have been here for a long time really know. >> i wrote denizens from mark's book which applies to both of these books. he said the frontier has always proved attractive to those with a facility for conjuring utopian images. i wanted to ask both of you kind of what the frontier means in the context of the c
people and sickened 751 in 20 states. this issue hits home for me because it started in massachusetts. at the center of this tragedy was the new england compounding center, also known as necc, and it was located in framingham, massachusetts. i met some of these victims of this terrible outbreak and heard about their struggles, like jerry cohen, a resident of pik pikesville, maryland, who went to the doctor for routine steroid injections to treat recurring back pain and received two doses that came from the contaminated lots. jerry suffered a stroke and had to adjust to a new life, dealing with dizziness, nausea, weakness and exhaustion. or melanie, whose mother went into a tennessee hospital to treat an acute back injury she suffered while mowing the lawn. instead of walking out of the hospital, marjorie instead became severely sick, spent months in the hospital and a nursing home and now has permanent -- permanent nerve damage and medical bills that are close to putting her into bankruptcy. for the last decade, complaints aboutsteabout sterility have bed benz necc yet the company was
-election of president obama, the election of the gentlelady from massachusetts, the presiding officer, today. it was a big day. it was a big deal. 20 women came to the senate. a new democratic woman, a distinguished just woman from the state of nebraska, and when they came forward with excitement, filled with passion to serve the nation, represent and be the voice of the people in their state and to get something done, and not only to do it in the lowest common denominator but also to be able to work together for the common good and worry about the next generation, not the next election. that's what we did. let's recall how we felt this time last year. let's get our act together and press on. madam president, i yield the floor. ms. mikulski: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from maryland. ms. mikulski: i was so excited talking about my topic i forget to note when i concluded the absence of a quorum, so i thereby ask to note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: a senator: madam president? the presiding officer: the senat
khrushchev during the cold war. this event from the hyannis museum in massachusetts is just over an hour. >> good evening, ladies and gentlemen. we want to welcome you here to the john f. kennedy hyannis museum. we're very happy to have you here this evening, and we're happy to have c-span with us as well for the author, martin sandler and rob sennett, who's a past chairman of the board of trustees of the jfk hyannis museum foundation. my name is dick neats, and i'm happy to have you with us, and we're looking forward to a wonderful program, and we thank you all again. i would give you a couple of reminders, if you would. please turn your cell phones off, since we are being recorded, i understand c-span will broadcast it within the next couple of weeks, maybe on the weekend within a couple of weeks, so keep an eye out for that, and if you would -- what was the other thing i was supposed to remind -- >> when they ask you -- >> oh, yes. the microphones you see here are not for distribution throughout our museum, but they are for c-span. so if you have a question, don't talk from the back o
the word. it comes from another massachusetts scholar penny adams and from the wonderful education. adams said basically was that when lincoln and the others got to washington in 1886 in the war began, no one knew what to do. they knew what the task was to be or when was headed for him. everyone without exception was to learn his business at the cost of the public. indianindeed, stewart and the os could be of no help to the young man seeking education. their education was to cost a million lives, not quite a million but close enough and $10 million more or less north and south before the country could recover its ballot and movement. the history of that tragic war and the deaths it caused was recounted in brilliant form by our current speaker as with great pleasure i invite the president of harvard university, doctor faust to join us. [applause] >> thank you so much for that very generous introduction, professor weinstein and all of you for being here tonight. it's a great pleasure and honor for me to talk for the first time its publication yesterday about this book, because so much of th
. and they would see more if west virginia changed its name to -- or if massachusetts had stamped land of candidate on its license plate. george orwell once wrote that it was impossible to prove definitively that shakespeare had been a great author. and said there is no test of literary merit except survival, which is in itself an index of majority opinion. i that stand alone can be have been a great president. author james macgregor burns the road the only authorized biography of jfk before the election said, although it was an admiring biography, burns criticized him for lacking moral passion, too much to his intellect, jewish to start. in short, being more harbored an -- harvard than irish. face explain -- lacking passion had excited such passionate grief, burns wrote, was it that he was handsome? his wife and kids? a statesman who have cute kids? he concluded it had to be something that transcended all this. i think the transcendent reason was that kennedy was being mourned for his promise as much as for his accomplishments. and that those accomplishments and the promise had become more evident
was a benefit directed at older people alone and not younger people and what massachusetts tells us the more direct analogous experience tells us young people come in very late. those who in massachusetts qualified for medicaid coverage or other kinds of coverage that did not require the payment of a premium came in fairly large numbers right away. premium paying customers didn't come until late as we cited in the past and only 123 folks came in massachusetts and the first month. for those of us who either have kids or some of you are young enough to remember when you were like at that age, it has always been the expectation in the case that the younger americans will wait until the last minute when they make a decision and apply and enroll. so that was our expectation that there would be the case and we tried to telegraph that in general about enrollment and the crescendo that we expect. there's no question that the problems on the web site have exacerbated the trend, which is why we have to work all the harder to make sure that it gets up and running and that we do everything we can to mak
some of it with you today. but i also bring greetings from medford massachusetts rotary, which is medford is about five miles north of boston. as it turned out its population is about 55,000, and when i was writing this book i sublease a 10 by 10 office space from a local architect who was, in fact, a one term rotary president and now he is signing up for a second term. he told me before game i told him us coming to speak to one of the most prestigious and oldest and certainly friendliest i know rhodri's in wichita may be bigger, he said keep it short. these people are on their lunch break. [laughter] but i did hear an awful lot and i'm glad you guys don't -- willard garvey didn't know how to keep it short. i think some of you enjoy that as well. but he was a faithful rotarian for more than 50 years, and this was his club. he joined rotary in 1950 and you could usually find in your without fail on monday. he was out of tow town and he on made it a point to visit with other rotary clubs like we had today. and around different cities in the united states. willard really loved rot
a senator from massachusetts, member of the house was very concerned about it. shelby, a conservative senator, was for it. so they said let's have opt-in instead of opt-out. these are the keywords. and, basically, opt out is pretty much what they give you now. if you're upset about something and you want to go through a rigamarole, you can say i want my data not used in this way. opt in you would have been required to give explicit permission for your information to be merged with other streams of information, then turned over to brokers of information, people who sell it, and you would have control over how this information was used. it's all the difference in the world. be opt in, opt out. and markey, as i say, and others went to clinton and said, look, whatever we think of this bill -- which is a horrible bill bill -- be you're going to sign it -- if you're going to sign it which you seem determined to do, why don't you at least have this opt-in protection over the records that are being merged. and clinton refused to do that. he promised at fist, and then he -- at first, and then
to be doing. >> yeah. well, i guess, if you're a conservative democrat from massachusetts, you get called a pragmatist. if you're a liberal republican from the south, you might get called a pragmatist. you know, kennedy, kennedy said sometimes it's not the labels that matter, and i go back and forth about whether he was right about that. i think the labels in some ways are useful lenses for helping us remember what actually happened. and that's, you know, that's really what i hope people >> my name is charles e. lee. he is running late, so we will go ahead and get started because this is being televised. the reporter on the scene when kennedy was killed. 1963. to my far left he was at docile and kennedy arrived he lives of the key players working on the warren commission that investigated the death of kennedy. was going to start with mr. willens. he is going to read five to eight minutes. then we will have chiles will read from his book for five to eight minutes the man then we will have this session and open it up to questions. thank you very much. >> proceed. >> like tech expressed by a
. welcome. mr. david -- correct? commissioner of banks for the terminal of massachusetts, serving in that position since november of 2010 overseeing the supervision of over 200 banks and credit unions with assets in access of 325 billion. he's the active contributor to consumer protection efforts both in massachusetts and nationally. in 20 # 13, he was elect as vice chairman of the board of directers of the conference of state bank supervisors on whose behalf he testifies here today. welcome. >> chairman warner, ranking members kirk and heller, and members of the subcommittee, i'm jennifer, the director of treasuries financial crimes enforcement network. i'm pleased to be here today to discuss the important regulatory enforcement and analytical work we're doing to prevent illicit actors from exploiting the u.s. financial system from technological advances create new ways to move money. recognizing the potential for abuse of emerging new payment methods and understanding that anti-money laundering protections must keep pace with these advancements, we began working with partners ye
california and massachusetts. other regions of the country; whole does not have a large presence in some states, like california and massachusetts. other regions are well aware that kentucky. to hear t cncer we country. but since epa i refuses tocom to kentucky, i decided on behalf of kentucky's coal miners and families that i would bring their concerns to you myself. the epa won't come to listen to us, we'll come here. to the epa. by now it is clear that this administration and your agency have declared a war on colt. for kentucky it means a war on jobs and our state's economy. the president outright stated his intention for the coal industry. this is what he had to say. if somebody wants to build a coal power plant. they can. it will bankrupt them. they're going to be charged a huge sum for the greenhouse gas being emitted. a direct quote from the president of the united states. one of the first things president obama did upon taking office in 2009 was to push through congress' cap-and-trade bill to try to push it through -- i might add. designed to hike utility rights and bankrupt the
of his life was in vermont and new hampshire, massachusetts also. nonetheless, he knew someone in ann arbor and came from the invitation of then president dan burton invited him in 1921 to be kind of a writer in residence. now, you can't throw a stone at a university without uncovering a writer or an artist in residence. but at that time, which is after all almost a century ago, it was close to a revolutionary notion. artists are kept at a very stiff arms removed from academe and frost was not a scholar, nor a university graduate himself. he ended up receiving all sorts of honorary degrees and became often a dr. of humane letters. at the time, he was some i.d. who is more known as a farmer and private citizen. for a university to invite him and say you are a person of consequence, why do you hang around was really rather remarkable. he came in 1821. the state for a year. he went back to vermont and returned again for a couple of years. 1923 and 224. so his tenure here was relatively brief. it was nonetheless during an important. but his creative life and the problems we think of as ab
military and veterans roundtables in massachusetts with holly petraeus, head of cfpb head of office of affairs. one issue for veterans is a growing scam involving the v.a.'s aid and attendance benefit, the benefit that helps cover the cost of nursing homes and in-home health aides for our disabled vets who don't have many resources. now, from what i understand the details of this scam are really grisly. a company offers to help a veteran sign up for the benefits. if the company determines the veteran has too many assets to qualify for the benefits, it tries to hide some of those assets by moving them to irrevocable trust or annuity that not only violates the spirit of the program, it often ends up hurting the veteran. the company generally charges huge fees, takes a fat cut of whatever financial product they end up selling to the veteran and moves the assets where the vets can't easily reach them meaning the veteran is actually in much worse financial shape than before the person applied for help. i understand one case where a veteran got set up with an annuity that wouldn't start p
. it was a terrible thing. it happened because of one individual company in massachusetts that was not being inspected or regulated, and they had a bad batch of drugs. >> you mentioned that montana company in the article and tweet yesterday on the procedural vote in the senate tweets that senate passes key vote to regulate pharmacy response to deadly meningitis. the outbreak started in massachusetts last year. why wasn't the fda responding to these sort of pharmacies? >> well, there was somewhat of a gray area in the law. the fda was responsible for these pharmacies, but there was a court ruling that had put some of their responsibility in to question. since outbreak the fda has been involved more heavily in inspections. but this law is to clarify that and creates a new voluntary category, which is somewhat controversial allowing some of these large pharmacy manufacturing facilities to register themselves and submit themselves to more fda scrutiny similar to the kind a traditional drug manufacturer undergo. >> who are the bill's main sponsors in the senate? >> in the senate it's tom harkin, the head o
the map. guest: i would agree with that. it is an imprecise term. in massachusetts on our line for independents. caller: i have been watching c- span for seven years, and i think this is a critical topic, and i want to say thank you to both of them, especially robert, for 20 years of opening this pandora's box. host: thank you. we go to alabama. caller: it sounds as though poverty is being equated with laziness. know theike to statistics for individuals that have college degrees that are receiving some of these benefits because they cannot find jobs. guest: i do not think laziness is the proper word. i do think that maintaining a strong work ethic and trying to be in the labor force as much as possible is an important factor in escaping poverty, but i also realize that in the current time there are millions of americans that simply cannot find jobs, and that is a problem with the current economy. is it is not so much laziness, but it is a question up inen somebody shows the welfare office and says i cannot find a job, i have children to support, i need assistance, i do not want
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 118 (some duplicates have been removed)